Pang–araw–araw Na Kabuhayan Ng Kababaihan

Pang–araw–araw Na Kabuhayan Ng Kababaihan

The Everyday Lives of Working Filipinas

 

Here we present images of women in today's Filipino economy. The economic crisis has led women to become active participants in the labor market; many women end up working in the informal sector. These women depict how Filipinas meet their family's basic necessities despite difficult circumstances by being practical and resourceful.

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© Adjie Albiento and Corrine Antonio

 

The Philippines is a country that struggles to balance its strong cultural traditions with participation in a highly globalized world. Thankfully, despite deeply engrained social constructions, Filipino society empowers women to work and allows women the freedom to exercise their rights. These women are consumers, workers, lovers and caregivers all at once. These women are who we see in the markets, the malls, and in our homes.

So what kind of work do women do in an urban yet developing economy, such as that in the Philippines? In the kind of urban economy depicted in these photos, we can see that women are active in the labor market. Many women have settled into informal work such as selling vegetables that she harvested from her backyard, giving services on the street like treating feet and toenails (pedicure) or treating hands and fingernails (manicure) at a customer's home or along the streets and selling banana-cue (caramelized banana) and kamote-cue (caramelized sweet potato).

Filipina women in urban poor communities are trying their best able to cope with the economic crisis by re-evaluating their skills and capabilities. They no longer want to rely solely on income from their husbands to sustain the family's needs. When the economic crisis hit families in the Philippines, many Filipina women responded by creating jobs for themselves in the informal economy. Some women even began working in positions that were typically performed by men. During a visit to a friend's house in Bulacan, Adjie got a ride on a tricycle (pedi-cab), and she was surprised to see that the driver was a woman. More and more often, women are choosing unexpected lines of work in order to provide for their families.


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Sofie
Sofie
الدنمارك

I love your photos of the Filipino women - they are really wonderful! It creates an amazing effect that a part is colored and a part is black and white!

Corrine Antonio
Corrine Antonio
الفلبين

Thank you very much. It was my partner's idea to make the women only coloured.

Hi, I like how the women were not portrayed as poor helpless victims here. Just curious if the women in the pictures gave their permission to be posted in this website?

Good article. I do agree that women in the Philippines boldly take on various roles in the labor market. Thanks for capturing such moments!

However, I also hope that soon, we'll see them thriving in the corporate world as well, or even in the world of politics. With the exception of Gloria Arroyo, Pinays need women political leaders to look up to.

Corrine Antonio
Corrine Antonio
الفلبين

Hi Clem, I've just revisited the exhibit again. To answer your question, yes, these women gave us permission to post their pictures, most were even expecting a media hype on the "Young Women Speaking the Economy" exhibit. They wanted to show the side of "Pinays" that continue to strive hard through these economic crises.

Hi Richgail, I think our country have a lot of Filipina political leaders we already look up to like Sen. Miriam Defensor-Santiago, Sen. Pia Cayetano, Sen. Loren Legarda, Hon. Risa Ontiveros-Baraquel, Sec. Leila De Lima and many more. :)



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