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Cartoon As a Political Manifesto
Women don't have a sense of humor. Women don't care about politics. Women don't want to be politicians. For eight years, these false truisms formed a haunting soundtrack to French cartoonist Catherine Beaunez's life.
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What does power look like?
What exactly is power? How do you know you've got it? Is power selfish, or can you use it for others? Is this what is meant by leadership? Is there a secret language of clothes that conveys power? We take a look at Power, Leadership and Appearance, asking, "What does power look like?"
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Is Biology Destiny?
For women in any political arena, is biology destiny? Do women gain power or lose power by what their bodies can and cannot do? Do biological differences between men and women decide what each is suited for and can accomplish: Raising children, tending homes, climbing mountains, serving in the military, negotiating policy and leading countries? Will the female body always be vulnerable in politics?
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Does environmental destruction politicize women?
Why is it that most recent conversations about the "planet in peril," including deforestation, climate change, natural disasters and changing water levels, rarely reference women? Women are disproportionately impacted by changes in the environment. And, with indigenous knowledges in tow and generations of experience working the land, gathering wood and fetching water, women bring unique, effective and sustainable solutions to environmental problems...
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Does Religion Instigate Or Hinder Women’s Political Participation?
A review of history shows that "God" has been a dominant factor in whether or not women participate in politics. Separation of church and state is a myth in many countries in the world, and, in the minds and hearts of many, an undesirable goal. In some places, devotion and faith catalyze women to take up a cause, political or otherwise...
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Can there be democracy without women?
The Roman and Greek civilizations, viewed as modeling modern day democracies, placed men as central public figures, although women appeared influential as goddesses in their respective mythologies. Their counterparts in Africa, Asia and the Pacific are said to have placed real women, and not just goddesses, in positions of genuine power, although it's not evident that those roles have translated into gains in modern day polities...
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Do Women’s Votes Matter?
The vote is a symbol of a citizen's full participation in government affairs. A vote is a consent to laws, rules and regulations, sometimes freely given, other times with notable hesitation. Historically, as democracies were established, the right to vote soon followed--at least for men, not for women and members of non-dominant racial groups...
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Do Women Change Elections?
While most women around the world had the right to vote by the mid 20th century, only in the last few decades have there been a significant number of women elected at local and national levels. And there is yet to be a critical mass. Today, women still face many barriers to participating meaningfully and competitively as candidates for office...
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Prepping Women for the White House
Nearly 100 years after universal suffrage, U.S. women have yet to hold the highest office in the land. Currently, they make up 18 percent of governors, 16 percent of senators and 16 percent of representatives...
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Why Do Women Cross Borders?
More than a century ago, women spent months traveling by ship to attend the first international congress on women's rights in Paris in 1878. Without the benefit of airplanes and Internet access, people's passages to and from international conventions were much more laborious and time-consuming; technological developments have made a world of difference...
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