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Picturing Power
All of us have seen a political poster past its time: peeling off a wall in tatters, or peeking out from underneath another poster of the next big thing.  Posters are, by their very nature, a throwaway form of art and communication.  But, when it comes to posters produced by and for India's women, one group wants to ensure these messages are not forgotten.
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Political Firsts
Countless American women have struggled to achieve equality with men and gain access to the boardrooms of power. Below is a timeline of women who have changed the face of American politics by being first to run for office, be it the Presidency, the Supreme Court or the Congress.
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The Ticket That Might Have Been
Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm was the first African-American woman elected to the United States Congress, and the first to run for President. She said she was proud to run, even though she knew she would lose. The aftermath of Shirley Chisholm's groundbreaking 1972 campaign is the subject of this article by women's rights advocate Gloria Steinem...
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Family Law in Morocco
Award-winning author Dr. Mounira Maya Charrad has been following women's rights and the implementation and evolution of the family law of Morocco for the past several decades...
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Painting Power and History
When artist Chinwe Uwatse takes her brush in hand, she recreates an ancient tradition of Nigerian women in modern form. Uli was the ancient body painting art form practiced by and for Igbo women, a predominantly Christian ethnic group in Nigeria. Uli artists adorned women's bodies with geometric and organic designs for special occasions or ceremonies, using dark ink that temporarily stained the skin...
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Cultural Wisdom
As the coeditor of the internationally bestselling expatriate women's anthology Tales from the Expat Harem, I contributed my favorite titles to VisualThesaurus.com last year for its “Dog Eared: Books We Love” column. The online tool for writers, students and teachers of writing, and marketing communications professionals worldwide, asked me to share books about the cultural wisdom that historically pools at the intersection of women and travel...
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The Power Suit
"Women watch themselves being looked at," writes the art critic John Berger. A woman "is almost continually accompanied by her own image of herself." Berger was writing primarily about the male gaze, yet his observations highlight the way a woman's appearance is always scrutinized. What a woman wears, her clothing and hairstyle, is not a trivial matter...
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Iron Ladies Uncovered
To many people, the idea of a woman in power just doesn't compute. Either she can't be a real woman, or she must be doing a really bad job at being powerful. Hence, the nicknames like "Iron Lady."
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Madame Mao
In many parts of the world and throughout history, women have come into leadership positions and been known as "Iron Ladies" because of their powerful husbands. One such figure was Jiang Qing, a woman who came to be called Madame Mao and who, after Chairman's death, fell from grace with the Chinese people...
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Taking Up Space at Greenham Common
Is there anything more personal -- and political -- to women than their bodies? Aware of the political charge of their bodies, women have physically hurled themselves in public spaces to protest wars, human injustice, and abuse of power. One of the most vivid and longstanding examples of women using their bodies to take up space in non-violent protest is the Women of Greenham Common.From 1981 to 2000, tens of thousands of British women mobilized to negotiate an end to nuclear proliferation in their hometowns...
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