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Granny D.
In June 2004, with Election Day only four months away, the Democratic Party was left without a candidate for the New Hampshire Senate seat. An unlikely contender stepped in to help bring out the vote. Standing just five feet tall, 94-year-old Doris Haddock had far more passion, determination and spunk than most 24-year-olds...
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The Ticket That Might Have Been
Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm was the first African-American woman elected to the United States Congress, and the first to run for President. She said she was proud to run, even though she knew she would lose. The aftermath of Shirley Chisholm's groundbreaking 1972 campaign is the subject of this article by women's rights advocate Gloria Steinem...
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Maquilapolis
Women from all over Mexico flock north to the city of Tijuana to find work in the maquiladoras, or factories, along the Mexico-United States border. They come for the promise of a steady income and a better future. More often, what they find is a toxic workplace and a life of desperate poverty. Women are recruited by the maquiladoras to staff the assembly lines because they are thought to be cheap, docile labor, but the women featured in the documentary film Maquilapolis (City of Factories) are proving just the opposite. Filmmakers Vicky Funari and Sergio De La Torre armed a group of workers with video cameras so they could document themselves...
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Théâtre Aquarium
My interpreter, Scheherazade Matallah, and I climb the steps to Naima Zitan's apartment, one room of which doubles as an office for Théâtre Aquarium. Three senior members of the organization lean on the table and passionately describe their history and dreams in a cacophony of French and Arabic...
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Family Law in Morocco
Award-winning author Dr. Mounira Maya Charrad has been following women's rights and the implementation and evolution of the family law of Morocco for the past several decades...
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Cultural Change Taking Root with BAOBAB
BAOBAB for Women's Human Rights, a non-governmental organization based in Lagos, Nigeria, believes change begins slowly, one woman at a time. But when that one woman connects to another, and then another, the collective momentum can take on a life of it's own.
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Women Between the Frontlines
Imagine beautiful, rugged landscapes of snow-covered mountains and blossoming orchard valleys. Envision the women and men who live there, the farmers and teachers and community members who raise their children between contested country lines.
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Follow the Leader
On January 16, 2006, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf took the oath of office as Africa's first elected female head of state. A team of filmmakers followed her through her first year in office and the documentary Iron Ladies of Liberia is the result.
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Señora Presidenta
Good afternoon, palace guards! Good afternoon, Mrs. President! On March 11, 2006, Dr. Michelle Bachelet, daughter of a renowned Chilean general who died in prison under Dictator Augusto Pinochet, marched gracefully before the presidential palace guards in Santiago, Chile. She stopped, expertly turned on her heels and called the guards to attention...
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The Power Suit
"Women watch themselves being looked at," writes the art critic John Berger. A woman "is almost continually accompanied by her own image of herself." Berger was writing primarily about the male gaze, yet his observations highlight the way a woman's appearance is always scrutinized. What a woman wears, her clothing and hairstyle, is not a trivial matter...
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